Effects of spot herbicide applications for control of cane needle grass patches in non-arable situations

Cane needle grass (Nassella hyalina (Nees) Barkworth) is perennial, exotic, unpalatable weedy grass from South America threatening critically endangered indigenous grasslands within the Western Grassland Reserve between Werribee and the You Yangs in Victoria, Australia. This trial examined dose response applications of spot herbicide treatments (glyphosate, flupropanate, flupropanate granules and fluazifop-P) applied individually onto patches of cane needle grass at a field site near Werribee. Cane needle grass survival and damage assessments were made at 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 13 months after treatments. Fluazifop-P and glyphosate caused the fastest foliage damage with higher rates causing apparent control after 3 months. However, almost all plants had recovered six months after treatment. Both liquid and granular formulations of flupropanate above a rate of 1 L ha-1 were providing good control of cane needle grass 13 months after treatment.


Cite this article as:

McLaren, D. and Butler, K. (2014). Effects of spot herbicide applications for control of cane needle grass patches in non-arable situations. Plant Protection Quarterly 29(3), 97-100.


 

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First published online: October 16, 2014